Finishing off crocheted bathmat

Completing my campervan rugcraft project

I have nearly completed the crocheted rug from old clothes I cut into thick fabric thread! The clothes I used to create this bathmat were too far gone to donate, and I don’t think folks on a fixed budget need to be offered torn, bleach-spotted, worn or stained clothing. Furthermore, I don’t want to waste a charity’s time or money transporting clothing that volunteers will only have to throw out. Throwing what could kindly be termed garbage into an op shop bin is just plain insulting to everyone involved. I am so grateful I have the luxury of time to spend diverting some material from landfill, but even so, I am probably not really helping…it is all a bit very, very depressing to think about sometimes.

Back to thoughts about crafting as opposed to conscious consumerism, ultimately, I needed a new bath mat and don’t have the money or inclination to visit a home furnishing store!

And so, after stitching the crocheted pieces together, I used the same gray wool I used to sew the discs to single stitch around the edge of the rug. Fairly pleased with the colour choice and how it turned out, reminds me of a galah’s colouring.

Crocheting a rug out of thick fabric

The underside of the work is a hot mess as usual.

Underneath a crochet project is a hot mess

I tied the long ends together  (I like to build a lot of redundancy into my rugs) and cut them short. After that I added some crocheted single stitch edging around to finish the mat off. The corners are not squared off, but I wanted this effect and if you have crocheted the discs flat, those jutting edges shouldn’t curl up because of future wear and tear.

How to reuse unwanted textiles divert from landfill

Crocheted textiles craft project tiny house

Feels good underfoot also! Best possible outcome. Took three evenings to make and the steps were easy.

How to make a reused fabric crochet rug of your own:

1. Crochet the most of the circles.

2. Crochet remaining circles, arrange and stitch together longways.

3. Attach long pieces together, weave in loose ends and crochet edging.

Crocheted textiles project reuse fabrics

Crocheted fabric bath mat crochet wool edging


Related; 

Parts one and two of the travel rug project;

Crocheting rugs and travelling in Spain

A fast crochet rug using t-shirt fabrics

About kellymarietheartist

I am an artist who, up until recently, was living and exhibiting within Toowoomba and the greater Granite Belt district. I have since packed up and left Australia, and am currently living and working in England. My work engages the craft involved in handmaking within a contemporary art context. I am drawn to the physicality of repetitive textile processes, and this is transcribed though the tactile quality of my forms. In particular, processes such as crochet, sewing and rug making serve as a proxy for growth within my personal environment. Many of my works imitate situations in nature, and they form organically as I create each individual piece, each addition both a continuation and re-enforcement of its predecessors. I enjoy using recycled materials for many of my works. Using crochet and other textile techniques to do this is an important part of my work as it celebrates a tradition of craft that has historically been relegated to 'women's work', with all the negative connotations that entails.
This entry was posted in Crafternoons, Crochet & Knitting, Europe, Re-use, Rugging, Textiles, Travelling and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

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