Crocheted gloves: Broomstick lace stitch and glove making

Crocheted gloves, making something with broomstick lace stitch.

Experiment

Experiment

While filling out paperwork and following due dates for various things on my artist schedule, there’s been some time for experimentation and learning new things, fortunately. One of those things has been broomstick lace stitch. This was via a really clear tutorial from nastazia.com. I have linked it; it really only took about 3 watches to get a really solid idea of what was needed to be done;

And I wasted no time in putting that stitch to something I’ve been wanting to create for awhile:

Crocheted gloves.

As I didn’t have the large knitting needle required for this stitch, I looked around for something with a similar diameter. The body of a recorder? Yes please!

Improvisation

Improvisation

So, after some hiccups with the first attempt, I had an idea of the stitch and it was time to apply it to a real world situation: Glove cuffs.

First, second and third

Top to bottom: First, second and third attempts

After creating those, I tied off the lace strips and began working my next stitches into the bottom of the broomstick lace strips.

Progress shot

Progress shot

I think did double crochet (USA) for 8-10 rows 1:1, measuring against my hand as I went. When I had it long enough, I did 4ch, 1sl.st into previous d.c, turn over, 6 s.c into each of the 4ch loops to create the lace-ish effect on the other end. Tie off and celebrate!

First one complete

First one complete

One glove down, I repeat this pattern for the second strip of broomstick lace.

2013-01-23 10.30.48

Complete!

Being right handed, I pinned the first one to my left hand to determine where to sew, where to place the buttons and where to make the thumbhole.

Hand measuring

Hand measuring

Sewn up

Sewn up

This is where it gets tricky, and I forgot to take a few of the photos. In short, you sew up the sides and around the thumbhole crochet 1:1 d.c and repeat the pattern used on the end of the gloves to make the lace around the thumbhole.

Croceted overlap attachment (bottom left)

Croceted overlap attachment (bottom left)

I also crocheted an extra flap along the wrist, adding two button holes. Woollen items stretch, and I’ve found it’s a good idea to include extra attachment structures to all woollen works.

Wearing the piece

Wearing the piece

Finished, without buttons. I just went through my button jar for those, and found four that were approxiately the same size.

2013-01-23 12.13.39

Different colours, heights and materials though.

The second is just a repeat of the first. I find it goes quicker too, now that I know for sure what to do.

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About kellymarietheartist

I am an artist who, up until recently, was living and exhibiting within Toowoomba and the greater Granite Belt district. I have since packed up and left Australia, and am currently living and working in England. My work engages the craft involved in handmaking within a contemporary art context. I am drawn to the physicality of repetitive textile processes, and this is transcribed though the tactile quality of my forms. In particular, processes such as crochet, sewing and rug making serve as a proxy for growth within my personal environment. Many of my works imitate situations in nature, and they form organically as I create each individual piece, each addition both a continuation and re-enforcement of its predecessors. I enjoy using recycled materials for many of my works. Using crochet and other textile techniques to do this is an important part of my work as it celebrates a tradition of craft that has historically been relegated to 'women's work', with all the negative connotations that entails.
This entry was posted in Crafternoons, Crochet & Knitting, Experiments, Re-use, Textiles, Toowoomba, Works in progress. Bookmark the permalink.

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